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It is up to the states and/or each facility to decide how they want to address granny cams.

Many states have attempted to pass legislation on the issue, but only a handful have succeeded, including, for example, New Mexico and Texas.

The attorney generals office says state law authorizes it to investigate Medicaid fraud and patient abuse or neglect.

Covert video surveillance is a type of search, Del Greco said, but because the office obtained consent from every resident or guardian whose care was recorded, it didnt need a warrant.

Sixty-three of those cases were opened following De Wines news conference.

And some of the other investigations involve the use of cameras, said De Wine spokeswoman Jill Del Greco.

Who pays for the cameras, and the internet connection that allows the family to monitor care?

According to Chicago elder care attorney Jason Lundy, it’s the resident and his or her family.

A new article on an industry website called Senior Housing News reveals that a growing number of states across the country are considering legislation to allow what are commonly called “Granny Cams” in skilled nursing homes – and some of these new laws would expand camera monitoring to assisted living facilities and other types of senior housing. Simply put, it’s a camera installed at the request (and expense) of the family of a nursing home resident that monitors the type of care the resident is receiving.

Since Washington State is among the five that already have Granny Cam laws in place, this form of resident monitoring will quite possibly affect you or someone you love. With new technology allowing more ways to track elder care, new state laws that regulate the practice are, in the words of the Senior Housing News article, “bringing privacy issues to a head.” Five states have such laws in place and two more are considering new laws that would, among other provisions, expand monitoring regulations beyond skilled nursing facilities.

The Ohio attorney general had just announced that he was shutting down a Zanesville nursing home after authorities had installed surveillance cameras in patients' rooms because of complaints about mistreatment. The Ohio attorney general had just announced that he was shutting down a Zanesville nursing home after authorities had installed surveillance cameras in patients rooms because of complaints about mistreatment.

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